Forum Posts

AttendServices
Mar 03, 2022
In Lost at Sea
Penryn Colts Rugby player, who drowned in a boating accident The impressive, swirly iron gates of the Penryn Rugby Club are dedicated to the memory of David Blake, a playing member of the Colts team, who tragically died aged 16 as the result of a boating accident, in November 1960. Made by Mr Dickie Dunstan, a blacksmith who had lived all his life in Penryn, and served as the town’s first Mayor, the gates were dedicated by Rev. Perry-Gore, Vicar of St. Gluvias, in February 1961. David Blake was a talented player in the Colts team. He had won County Colours, and had gone far in the area trials towards a place in the England team; he was also the recipient of a County Rowing medal and the School Athletic Prize during his time at Penryn County Secondary School. As the younger son of the publicans who kept the Three Tuns Hotel in Penryn (now The Thirsty Scholar), he had left Penryn County Secondary School in July 1960 to take up a position as an electrician's apprentice. On the Sunday of the fateful accident, David called for his friend, Neil Winnan, a shipwright's apprentice, to go out in Neil's new sailing dinghy. Sailing down from Penryn bridge mid-afternoon, the boys went down to Falmouth Harbour, with David steering and Neil in charge of the sails. Turning from the shelter of the harbour, they entered Carrick Roads, but soon realised that the wind was too strong and decided to turn back. As they turned, the boat filled with water and the boys jumped clear, about 150-200 yards from shore. Initially, both boys hung on to the upturned boat, but David decided that he would be able to swim to shore, and set off: Neil followed him, feeling it was better to stay together, but after 30 yards or so, David shouted for help, and Neil went to assist him. The boys continued swimming, but twice more Neil needed to go to David’s aid, and a short time after this, David disappeared from view. As Neil looked around for his friend, a tug-boat appeared close-by, and eventually Neil was able to be pulled aboard. By this time, David was nowhere to be seen, and a search party was sent out. His body was recovered floating near to Trefusis Point later that same day. David’s funeral was held on Tuesday 6th December 1960, at St Gluvias church, Penryn, and the gates to the Rugby Club were dedicated just over 2 months later, on 20th February 1961, before a senior Home game against St Ives. The event was well-attended, and the unveiling of the plaque at the side of the gates was performed by David’s father, Mr R Blake, who sincerely thanked the Club and all those who had been connected with the organisation of such a beautiful tribute to his son. The enduring presence of the gates at Penryn Rugby Club is testimony to the integration of the Club with the local community, both now and during its long 150 years of history.
David Blake content media
0
0
8
AttendServices
Feb 17, 2022
In Lost at Sea
Engineer on the RMS Titanic Died: 15th April, 1912 Commemorated: on the family grave in Falmouth Cemetery Henry Creese was a Deck Engineer on board the Titanic, who was one of the many to lose his life when the ship sank in April 1912. Henry was born in 1868 in Falmouth, and was 45 at the time of his death. A year before the fateful voyage, he is recorded as living in Enfield Grove, Woolston, an area just to the east of Southampton, with his wife Elizabeth (also born in Falmouth) and two daughters born in 1898 in Cardiff and 1904 in Southampton, respectively. So it would seem that Henry had moved around the UK whilst working as a Marine Engineer. This gravestone records the death of a young son, Henry, in 1905, who had been born in Dorset; the burial record shows they were living in Harbour Terrace at this time, so maybe Henry Snr had moved his family to live here for a few years before moving back to Southampton. Online research reveals Henry Phillip is also mentioned on the headstone of his parents - Charles and Jane Creese - in Plymouth. An older brother of Henry, William, is also commemorated on this memorial: he was killed in action in 1917, aged 60. https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/50869338/henry-phillip-creese We can deliver flowers, or another token of remembrance, to the family grave of Henry Creese in Falmouth on your behalf:
Henry Phillip Creese content media
0
0
4
AttendServices
Feb 15, 2022
In Lost at Sea
St Ives lifeboat crew member, lost in 1939 Drowned: 23rd January, 1939 Laid to rest: Barnoon Cemetery, St Ives The fate of the St Ives' lifeboat - launched at 3am on the morning of 25th January 1939 to assist a vessel in distress 2 miles NNE of St Just - is graphically described in a newspaper article from the Cornishman, on 26th January 1939. On the outward journey to assist the boat in distress, a large wave capsized the lifeboat near to Clodgy Point, and four of the crew were washed overboard. The boat was then washed towards Godrevy, and a second immense wave capsized the boat and three more crew - including Matthew Barber - were washed overboard. The remaining crew member, W Freeman, hung on to the steering equipment, and very quickly the boat was thrown by a large wave on to a ledge near Godrevy lighthouse, enabling him to scramble on to dry land. Matthew Barber's body was washed up at Godrevy beach later that day, and he left a wife, Annie, and two young children. One of them, John, later had a son who was also lost at sea, and is commemorated alongside the grandfather he never met on the headstone here. We can deliver flowers, or another token of remembrance, to the resting place of Matthew Barber at Barnoon Cemetery on your behalf:
Matthew Barber content media
0
0
4
AttendServices
Feb 15, 2022
In Lost at Sea
A ship's carpenter, mysteriously lost at sea Died: September, 1872 Inscription of his loss: Barnoon Cemetery, St Ives Stephen Legg was born in 1840 in Quay Street, Madron (near Penzance), to a father who was a master mariner. He had an elder brother who was also at sea, and 5 other siblings. In 1865 he married Ellen Grose, and by 1871 they were living in Coulsons Place, Penzance with two daughters Elizabeth (born in 1866) & Margaret (born 1868) and a son, William Henry, born in 1871. Ten years later, the 1881 census shows Ellen and her children living in the same place, but Ellen is already indicated as a widow. Later, Ellen is recorded as living in St Ives with her daughter, Elizabeth, who married Richard Baragwanath in 1892, and their daughter, Lily. Evidently, this is why the memorial to Stephen is in St Ives, rather than in Penzance where she and Stephen lived during their married life. So what happened to Stephen Legg? The Royal Cornwall Gazette reported in January 1872 that the Almira - a fully-rigged ship - had left New Brunswick in mid-September 1871, carrying a cargo of American yellow pine baulks and deals, and in the absence of a recent sighting of the ship 'all hope is not yet gone, but there is a very very anxious time of it'. Stephen is noted as being onboard as the ship's carpenter, and a later report in February 1882 notes that a large number of yellow pine had been washing ashore along the coast from Mevagissey to Penzance. These timbers were likely to be being imported for use as mine-props and headgear framework, though in this case they did not reach the intended port. The website www.wrecksite.eu notes that the ship foundered in March 1882, yet even by the time of the 1881 census, he was assumed to have perished at sea. There is no indication from the press archive that Stephen Legg's body was recovered. It seems Stephen was commemorated here after his son-in-law Richard had passed away. We can deliver flowers, or another token of remembrance, to the place where Stephen Legg is commemorated in Barnoon Cemetery on your behalf:
Stephen Legg content media
0
0
15
AttendServices
Feb 15, 2022
In Miners and their families
Cornish miner who died in British Columbia Died: 3rd November, 1904 Commemorated: St Day Road Cemetery, Redruth Born in Redruth to a father who was a tin miner, John Nicholas had two older brothers - William, who was a mine carpenter, and Stephen who was a tin miner age 15, but subsequently became a teacher of music - a younger brother, and two older sisters. Their mother, Ann, sadly died in 1890, at the age of only 52,and the eldest daughter, Elizabeth - known as Bessie - took over care of the family. In the 1891 census, John is shown as working as a grocer's assistant in Redruth. John's eldest sister, Bessie, died early in 1898. John married a local girl, Mary Jeffery, in November 1898, at the Treleigh church, and they lived, perhaps together with her parents, in the North Country area just outside of Redruth. By this time, John was working as a tin miner, and in 1901 a son, called William, was born to the couple. Not long after the 1901 census, John must have migrated to Canada to work as a miner - perhaps work in Cornwall was becoming hard to obtain as mines closed down in response to not being economically viable. John found work in Canada as a miner, and worked there for 3 years, but unfortunately he died in Ladysmith, aged 31, of a form of pulmonary tuberculosis, after an illness of 4 months. It is not clear whether his wife and child went with him to Canada, or whether he had travelled alone and intended to send remittances back to Cornwall, as many miners did at this time of economic difficulty. We can deliver flowers, or another token of remembrance, to the Nicholas family grave on your behalf:
John Nicholas content media
0
0
2
AttendServices
Feb 15, 2022
In Miners and their families
Young miner who died in an accident at Great Condurrow Mine, near Camborne Died: 9th March, 1907 Laid to rest: Roskear churchyard, Camborne Born in Camborne in to the family of a tin miner, Arthur was living in Rosewarne Road and attending school at the time of the 1891 census. By the age of 20, he was living at the back of North Parade in Camborne with one older and two younger sisters and his parents. Arthur's father was working as a stoker on a traction engine at this time, perhaps having a physical reason for having come out of the mines. Arthur was working as a plasterer. Arthur married Beatrice Stephens from Pendarves St, who was two years his junior, in 1903, when Beatrice was 24; at this time, Beatrice had finished employment as a shoe machinist and was living with her widowed mother and unmarried siblings, alongside a lodger who was working as a tin miner. After their marriage, it is possible that they went to live with Arthur's family in North Parade, and Arthur evidently changed jobs to work in mining - maybe he was drawn by higher wages, to enable the young married couple to find a home of their own. On the morning of 9th March, Arthur went early to work at Great Condurrow Mine to dig a deep trench for pipes to be laid in, but tragedy struck when the trench collapsed, and Arthur was buried alive. His work colleagues struggled to free him, but their efforts were in vain. After his death, Beatrice returned to live with her mother at Pendarves St, and is recorded there in 1911, helping with running the boarding house. We can deliver flowers, or another token of remembrance, to the resting place of Arthur in Roskear Churchyard:
Arthur Coombe content media
0
0
43
AttendServices
Feb 15, 2022
In Miners and their families
Mine Manager at South Crofty for almost thirty years Died: 11th February, 1911 Laid to rest: Roskear churchyard, Tuckingmill Josiah Paull was born in Camborne at Roskear Villas in 1871 to a father from Cornwall and a mother from Somerset; his father was likely to have worked in the mining sector, as Josiah had 3 older siblings born in Australia between 1861 and 1863. His father passed away when Josiah was 7 or 8 and his mother took to farming to support her family. Josiah married Julia Edwards in Camborne in 1896, and shortly after they moved to the Transvaal area of South Africa where their eldest child was born. By 1899 they were back in Camborne, where Julia gave birth to a second child. Josiah was Mine Captain of South Crofty from 1903 to 1930, and was on the Board of Directors for the mine until he retired in 1943. He passed away in 1947, and his wife Julia died ten years later. There is more information about Josiah's life in the Museum at Heartlands, which is well worth a visit: www.heartlandscornwall.com We can deliver flowers, or another token of remembrance, on your behalf to the resting place of Josiah Paull:
Josiah Paull content media
0
0
0
AttendServices
Feb 14, 2022
In Miners and their families
Mining graduate of the Royal School of Mines, London, who died in Camborne Died: 14th September, 1902 Laid to rest: Camborne Cemetery, Camborne Charles was the only son of Mr Alfred Sington, a Manchester-born barrister. Charles was born in Manchester, and the family, including his younger sister Gladys, moved to London in 1887, when Charles was a young boy of 7. The family lived in Brondesbury Road, Willesdon, and Charles attended Dulwich college- a private school - before studying at the Royal School of Mines, south Kensington, London. This is the institution which famously plays rugby with the Camborne School of Mines in the long tradition of the Bottle Match! On the 1901 census, he is still living with his family in Willesdon and studying at RSM, so it must have been later that year, or early 1902, when he moved to Cornwall, presumably to take up a position in the mining industry. He was living in Wellington Road, Camborne, when he tragically died at the age of 22. He had married in Camberwell in 1900, and both his parents, wife and sister attended the funeral here. The Redruth and Cornubian Times reports, in September 1902, in some detail about the funeral - suggestive that the attendance of Mr & Mrs Sington from London attracted some attention. The paper reports that the coffin was unpolished oak with walnut mouldings. Charles' parents later endowed a prize to St Paul's School in London - where Charles was noted to have been a Sunday School teacher - to give an annual prize to 'the best boy in the school'. His father passed away in London in October 1907, aged only 56; his mother, Ada, lived in Hampstead until her death in 1931, aged 78. Charles' sister Gladys never married - perhaps she cared for her parents in their later years - and also lived in Hampstead until her death in 1964 at the age of 77. We can deliver flowers, or another token of remembrance, to the resting place of Charles Sington at Camborne Cemetery:
Charles Ernest Sington content media
0
0
1
AttendServices
Feb 14, 2022
In Miners and their families
Mine-girl working at Agar Mine, Redruth, who died in an accident Died: 6th January, 1894 Laid to rest:St Day Road Cemetery, Redruth Ellen Vincent, age 22 was killed in a tragic accident at Wheal Agar Mine on the dressing floor. Local press at the time reports that Ellen's scarf became entangled in machinery, and she was pulled in to it and strangled. Reportedly, the accident happened on her last day of work at the mine, prior to leaving to be married. Ellen had been born in 1868 in Redruth, the third daughter at the time of her birth, and later joined in the family by 5 younger siblings. They lived in the Trevingey area of the town, not far from St Euny church, and by age 13, Ellen was working as a tailoress, whilst her father and older sisters were working at a tin mine. Following the death of her father, the 1891 census records Ellen's mother living in St Day Road; her oldest brother is working as a grave-digger at the cemetery, a younger brother is working underground (at age 14) and 3 of her sisters are working at a tin mine. At this date, it seems that Ellen has moved out of the (presumably crowded!) family home; it may be that she is the 'Nellie' Vincent recorded as a lodger in a house in Illogan, living with the Harris family, including their daughter Eliza. Both Eliza and Nellie are indicated as working at a tin mine; presumably Wheal Agar, where Ellen was to meet her untimely death just 3 years later. The mine where Ellen worked was combined with another mine nearby, to become East Pool and Agar Mine. The buildings of this mine are now a National Trust property: www.nationaltrust.org.uk/east-pool-mine
Ellen Vincent content media
0
0
5
AttendServices
Feb 14, 2022
In Miners and their families
Miner, aged 20, who died from a fall at East Pool Mine Died: 9th May, 1907 Laid to rest: Gwennap Churchyard Frederick Tucker was less than a week away from his twenty-first birthday when he died as a result of a fall in East Pool Mine, on 9th May 1907.His death came less than 36 hours after that of another young miner, Thomas Plint, illustrating how dangerous underground working could be. Frederick lived with his parents, Henry and Emily in Lanner (about four miles away from East Pool Mine) - he was the second son in the family, with his elder brother working as a tin miner at age 16. Frederick was working as a draper's assistant when he was 15, but started work underground soon after this - first at West Basset mine for three and half years, and then starting work at East Pool Mine in 1904. The family was large: Frederick had four younger brothers and two younger sisters. The work that Frederick was engaged with at East Pool Mine was fairly typical: after a shaft (vertical tunnel) had been sunk, miners worked to widen-out areas to extract metal-rich ore, creating stopes, or underground man-made caverns. This was done by drilling holes in to which dynamite was loaded and exploded: the holes were made by 'percussion drilling' -essentially, a long metal drill-bit was repeatedly hammered in to the rock face by one man, and frequently turned to avoid it sticking by a fellow miner. Before work could commence at the start of each shift, the staging (wooden shelf-type platform) needed to be fixed on to the rock-face at the required location: this is where the miners stood while drilling. Frederick and his work-mate, Ernest, did this after they had eaten breakfast together underground at the start of their shift, and then proceeded to start drilling at 8 am. On this day, Ernest was hammering, and Frederick was holding the drill-bit and rotating it. Ernest and Frederick worked like this for almost an hour then, at around 9 am, Frederick gave the signal to stop hammering, which was used from time to time for miners to 'catch breath' from the arduous physical work. On this occasion, though, just as Ernest was wiping the perspiration from his brow, without warning, Frederick fell backwards off the wooden staging, and down. Ernest tried to grab him, but without success, and Frederick fell over 50 m on to hard rock at the base of the stope, and witnesses think that he may have hit the sides of the shaft on the way down. A tragic end to a young life, and also very traumatic for the other men working in the mine at the time. At the inquest in to Frederick's death, there was no evidence that he suffered from ill health or fainting episodes, or any other illness, so the conclusion was that it was an accident. The Mine Captain was asked if it could be possible for men to secure themselves to the rock face with ropes to avoid such deaths, but Mr Tamblyn replied that the ropes could hinder movement of the miners, and make it harder for them to avoid falling rock. He also reported that this was the first accident of this nature since the shaft had been sunk 8 years previously, so though miners were evidently very careful, accidents were still possible. The funeral of Frederick Tucker and that of Thomas Plint (who had died at the Mine just one day earlier) were on the same day, and many miners who knew them wished to attend. In recognition of this, the Mine Captain provided four horse-drawn wagons, leaving from East Pool Mine, to convey the miners: Frederick's funeral was in Gwennap, and that of Thomas Plint was at Redruth. The miners arrived at Gwennap church for Frederick's funeral service, which included the hymn 'God our help in ages past' and proceeded to follow the coffin to the graveside, where one of Frederick's brothers collapsed with grief. After Frederick's untimely death, it can be seen from later census information that his father gave up working as a miner, and none of Frederick's four younger brothers went working underground, an indication perhaps of how much his death continued to impact his immediate family. We can hope that the close-knit mining community, though, was able to help console the family in their loss. We can deliver flowers, or another token of remembrance, to the lychgate at Gwennap church in memory of Frederick on your behalf:
Frederick Tucker content media
0
0
2
AttendServices
Feb 14, 2022
In Miners and their families
Young miner killed in an accident at East Pool Mine, Redruth Died: 8th May, 1907 Laid to rest: St Day Road Cemetery, Redruth Thomas Plint was the third of four children born to Mark and Mary Ann Plint. Both parents were born in Camborne, and his father, Mark, was working as a Tin dresser (working at the surface to remove waste rock from the valuable tin ore) from at least the age of 17, when he appears in the 1881 Census as living with his parents at Foundry Row, Camborne. He married Mary Ann Brown in 1886, when he was 20 years old, and she was 18; their eldest child, James, was born in Camborne in 1887. A daughter, Florence, was born in 1890, followed by Thomas in 1895 and a fourth child, Ethel, in 1900. The family were living in Camborne in 1901, at Hugh Ville Street. Perhaps the demands of an expanding family meant that Thomas' father needed to earn higher pay, or maybe a downturn in the tin price led to difficulties in getting work, but in 1898 and 1901, Thomas' father sailed from Southampton to Cape Town, South Africa, presumably to work in the developing mines there. He left the family in Cornwall. Sadly, his father died in South Africa in February 1902, when Thomas was seven years old, and his youngest sister not yet two. In December 1904, when Thomas was nine, he, his mother, older brother and two sisters, all embarked on the 'Walmer Castle' ship from Southampton to Durban; presumably his eldest brother, James, aged 19, had prospects of work there. Late in 1905, Thomas, his mother and two sisters came back to Cornwall, though his elder brother James must have stayed to work in South Africa. Thomas started work at East Pool Mine in early 1906. Thomas Plint had just completed an eight hour shift at East Pool Mine in early May 1907, at the 380 fathom level - about 500m below surface - when tragedy struck. Thomas was leaning against a wagon, approximately 15 feet (3 m) away from the opening of the shaft, waiting for the skip to descend to carry he and his step-brother, James, up the surface. A loud cracking noise was heard, and Thomas was seen to fall to the floor, unconscious. It seems that as the skip moved in the shaft above them, it dislodged a rock about 4 m higher than the level Thomas was on, and it fell, bounced against the sides of the shaft, and struck Thomas on the head. Thomas was quickly taken to surface and removed to Redruth Miners Hospital, less than a mile away at Barncoose, but sadly he died later that night. His funeral was attended by many of his fellow miners: a local paper from that time, describes how 4 horse-drawn wagons were provided by East Pool Mine to transport the miners to Busveal, where his coffin was resting at his mother's house. The Captain of the mine, Captain Tamblyn, entered the house, and led the coffin out, and the miners, gathered four-deep around the door to sing a hymn before the procession set off on foot to the cemetery. Before entering the gates of the cemetery, another hymn was sung, then the coffin borne to the (now derelict) chapel in the centre of the burial ground for the service. There are no records for Thomas' mother, or his sisters, after 1908 in Cornwall, so perhaps they moved to South Africa after Thomas' death, to be supported by his older brother James. The accident that ended his life at only 23 years of age was sadly not unusual; another accident, also resulting in loss of life, happened at the same mine within a few days of Thomas' death - see Frederick Tucker. But the loss of this young man would have been felt keenly by his family, and the touching epitaph here gives some restrained indication of the sense of loss: 'We cannot Lord thy purpose see, But all is well that's done by thee'.
Thomas Plint content media
0
0
11
AttendServices
Feb 14, 2022
In Heroes & Victims of War
Victim of Spanish Flu at the end of World War One Died: 16th December, 1918 Commemorated: on the family grave at St Day Road Cemetery, Redruth Cesil (on other documentation it is spelt 'Cecil' so the different spelling is either a mistake or fits with family practice) is remembered on the family grave here, having died just after the end of the First World War while serving in Salonika, Greece. The family must have been relatively wealthy, as they lived in a fairly ornate house in the West End of Redruth, called Trengweath, according to the 1911 census. Cecil died of Influenza in the 18th Station Field Hospital, aged 23, while a member of the Royal Army Medical Corps. The poor conditions along this front-line are described by Jan Morris in the final volume of her Pax Britannica trilogy, 'Farewell the Trumpets'. Cesil was interred at Kirechkoi-Hortakoi Military Cemetery in Greece. The 'Spanish Flu' pandemic of 1918 infected up to 500 million people, and killed around 20 million. The story of the epidemic is described in 'Pale Rider' by Laura Spinney: well worth a read. We can deliver flowers, or another token of remembrance, to the family grave of Cecil Carbis on your behalf:
Cesil Carbis content media
0
0
1
AttendServices
Feb 14, 2022
In Heroes & Victims of War
Brothers from Redruth who attended Camborne School of Mines, who served and died in World War Two Died: 8th September 1941 & 15th April 1945 Commemorated at: St Day Road Cemetery, Redruth Brothers John and Edward Rodwell were born and brought up in Redruth, and both attended the Camborne School of Mines. Both of the brothers signed-up to serve during the Second World War, in the RAF, and were tragically killed - John in 1941, aged 20, and his younger brother Edward towards the end of the war, in 1945, while flying over Tangiers, north Africa, aged 22. John and Edward are commemorated on the war memorial at Camborne School of Mines, on the Redruth War Memorial, and on the RAF memorial in London. Edward is interred in Tangiers, where he died, and there is no indication of where John may be laid to rest. Edward was married; online research suggests he married Viola Mackenzie in Surrey during the second quarter of 1944, perhaps just before he left to serve. The parents of John and Edward - Lawrence and Lillian Rodwell - are also buried here; their father was a mining engineer. We can deliver flowers, or another token of remembrance, to the headstone commemorating the Rodwell brothers and their parents at St Day Road Cemetery, Redruth:
John Rodwell & Edward Rodwell content media
0
0
1
AttendServices
Feb 14, 2022
In Heroes & Victims of War
Redruth boy who died serving with the Royal Navy, age 17 Died: 19th December, 1941 Commemorated at: St Day Road Cemetery, Redruth Stanley was only 17 years old when he was serving onboard the cruiser HMS Neptune during enemy action in the Mediterranean. Having been born and raised in Redruth, he was serving onboard with the Royal Navy as a 'Boy, 1st Class' during the First battle of Sirte, an engagement between the British Navy and that of Italy that took place on 17th December 1941. The ship he was serving on left Malta in the early hours of 19th December to pursue part of the Italian force but ran in to a minefield 20 miles off Tripoli, hit 4 mines in succession and was sunk. All but one of the 768 men on board lost their lives. Given Stanley's young age, this was almost certainly his first posting: a sad loss of a young life. His parents, Stanley, who was born in Falmouth, and Clara from Redruth, are also commemorated here. We can deliver flowers, or another token of remembrance, to the headstone of Stanley Street on your behalf:
Stanley Street content media
0
0
5
AttendServices
Feb 10, 2022
In Heroes & Victims of War
Munitionettes at the Hayle explosives factory Died: 20th December, 1916 Laid to rest: Phillack churchyard, near Hayle These two young women were working together at the Hayle explosives factory - one of 147 munition production sites that were set up across the UK by David Lloyd George, following a shortage of explosive shells at the front line in 1915. These factories were staffed largely by women, as many young men were away on the front lines and included sites here and several around Camborne. The work, by its nature, was dangerous, and deaths from chemical exposure or explosions were not uncommon, though the majority of incidents were not reported in the press, lest it affect national morale. Cissie Rogers, aged 20, was killed alongside May Stoneman as a result of an accident at the National Explosive Factory in Hayle, whilst processing cordierite. May Stoneman was aged 21, and was the eldest child in a large family of at least 10 children. At the age of 15, May had been working as a biscuit parker in a local factory, and perhaps moved to work at the munitions factory for a higher wage. She had spent the first six or seven years of her life in Brooklyn, New York, USA, where she and four of her younger siblings were born. Their father, William, was a Saddler and harness maker, and the family returned to Cornwall around 1903, perhaps for William to work at one of the foundries in Hayle which relied on horse-power to move raw materials and finished goods. The loss of these two young women would have been keenly felt by their families and wider community, although their deaths were not widely announced. We can deliver flowers or another token of remembrance, to the graves of May and Cissie (which are adjacent to each other) on your behalf:
May Stoneman and Cissie Rogers content media
0
0
6
AttendServices
Feb 10, 2022
In Heroes & Victims of War
French sailor from the 'Finistere' interred at Gwithian Died: 9th June, 1918 Laid to rest: Gwithian churchyard This is a war grave of a young French sailor, aged 20, who was serving in the Marine Nationale (the French Navy) when he died. His grave is tucked close to the north side of the beautiful Gwithian church, appropriately sheltered from the waves on the north coast just nearby. Information on www.wrecksite.eu indicates that the vessel he was onboard - a seamer called 'Finistere' - was travelling between Cardiff and Bordeaux with a cargo of coal when it went missing. This website indicates that the steamer had around 26 people on board, the majority of which were not found. Six other French sailors from the Finistere are laid to rest at Camborne Cemetery: a Lieutenant, and two sailors, like Alfred, and three that were not identified. Bodies from the wreck must have washed-up to shore and been buried closest to where they were found; the plaque on the grave at Camborne shows evidence that it was extended to accommodate the three unidentified mariners when their bodies were interred here. These graves are a poignant reminder of how far and wide the misery of war was felt across Europe. We can send flowers, or another token of remembrance, to the resting place of Alfred Michel at Gwithian on your behalf:
Alfred J Michel content media
0
0
1
AttendServices
Feb 10, 2022
In Heroes & Victims of War
Sisters widowed by World War One, who lived in Redruth Died: January 16th 1950 (Ann Bullen) & 29th December 1952 (Ethel Annear) Laid to rest: St Day Road Cemetery, Redruth Ethel and Eliza (known as Ann) were born in Heywood, Lancashire, in 1885 and 1891, in to a family with two older brothers, and a father that worked as a book keeper for the railway. Their eldest brother, George, was working in the silk industry by the age of 13. Sadly, both parents died fairly young - around the age of 50 - and on the 1901 census, George is the head of the household; he is working as a textile machinist. Their second-eldest brother is a Clerk at the waggon works (probably the same office where his father had been employed) and Ethel, at 16, is the Housekeeper for the family. Change of circumstance or family connections had bought Ethel and Ann to Redruth by the time of the 1911 Census; they were living in Clinton Terrace, with Ethel working as a dressmaker and Ann as a draper's shop assistant. In the later part of 1911, Ann married Ernest Francis Bullen, who had been born in Redruth, so perhaps the sisters had moved to Cornwall as a result of Ann meeting Ernest. The newly weds lived together with Ethel on St Day Road, Redruth, and a daughter - Mary (known as Molly) was born to Ann and Ernest in 1914. Ethel married a local mason, Noel Annear, in 1915, though by this date Noel may have already been enlisted in the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry. Both Ann's and Ethel's husbands went to fight in the First World War, and both of them perished: Noel Annear died of wounds in France in June 1916, less than a year after he'd married, and Ernest also died in France, in April 1918. The two widowed sisters continued to live together - in Bassett Street, Redruth and on the 1939 survey, Ethel is indicated as a 'confectioner', and Ann is a 'carsetter'. Ann's daughter Molly lived with them, and when Molly married a local man, Henry Stephenson, in 1937, and the newly married couple seemed to have moved in. There is no record of children born to Molly and Henry, and Molly died tragically young, at the age of only 34, in 1948; perhaps of complications with childbirth. Her mother, Ann, outlived her by only two years, and her Aunt Ethel passed away two years later. We can deliver flowers, or another token of remembrance, to the resting place of Ann and Ethel on your behalf:
Ann Bullen and Ethel Annear content media
0
0
7
AttendServices
Feb 10, 2022
In Heroes & Victims of War
Brothers killed a year apart in World War Two Died: 22nd August 1941 & 4th December 1942 Commemorated at: Crantock churchyard. Lionel Douglas Hall was in service with the Royal Artillery when he was killed in August 1941, while attached to the Royal Air Force. He had been born during the First World War in Essex, and his parents were living in Surrey at the time of his death. He was 25 years old. See also: www.cornwallswarhistory.co.uk Frederick Claude Hall was a Lieutenant in the Artists Rifle brigade, and the brother of Lionel Douglas Hall in the Royal Artillery. Frederick was seconded to the 1st Battalion of the East Sussex Regiment when he was killed, age 27, early December 1942, just over a year after his brother was killed. In addition to his name on the grave here, he is additionally commemorated on the war memorial at Medjez-al-Bab, in Tunisia. His wife, Pamela Mavis Hall, was from Sevenoaks in Kent. Lionel and Frederick are remembered here alongside their mother, Dorothea, so we can assume that she moved to live near to Crantock later in her life, and wanted her sons to be remembered on her headstone alongside her own name. We can deliver flowers, or another token of remembrance, to the headstone of the Hall family on your behalf:
Lionel & Frederick Hall content media
0
0
1
AttendServices
Feb 10, 2022
In Heroes & Victims of War
Traction Engine driver, born in Bristol, who died at Gallipoli in the First World War Died: 13th August, 1915 Laid to rest: St Day Road Cemetery, Redruth William Rudd was born in Bristol and was living with his family - a wife, Mary, born in Ireland, 2 sons and 2 daughters - in Chapel Street, St Day around 1911. William was working as a stationary traction engine driver, and it seems that the family had moved to the Redruth area around 1908, as his older 3 children were born either around Bristol or Portsmouth. William joined up to serve in the National Reserve Army when the First World War broke out, and was onboard the HMS Royal Edward, engaged in the Gallipoli campaign, when the ship was sunk by a torpedo. Ships in the area at the time managed to save some of those onboard, but The Times reported in September 1915 that 864 men had been lost, though other sources reported varying figures, both higher and lower. Private Rudd was aged 43 at the time of his death. His youngest daughter, Mary Elsie, is also buried here. We can deliver flowers, or another token of remembrance, to the resting place of William Rudd on your behalf:
Private W H Rudd content media
0
0
8
AttendServices
Feb 10, 2022
In Heroes & Victims of War
Child evacuee who died at Tehidy Isolation Hospital Died: 8th April, 1940 Laid to rest: St Day Road, Redruth John Lambert was a child of seven, evacuated to Cornwall during the Second World War, when he died at Camborne Isolation Hospital, Tehidy. This institution was mainly used for patients with tuberculosis, so we may assume this is what ailed John, and is the reason for his early death. Online research suggests John was evacuated to Cornwall from either Barnet (in north London) or Liverpool. He may have been lodged with a family somewhere in the Redruth area, before being transferred to hospital, or if he was already ill prior to evacuation, he may have been moved directly to the hospital from a ward elsewhere. In line with the government advice to maintain morale, reference to his death cannot be found in any newspapers of the time. Given the restrictions during the war, one can doubt whether his parents were able to come and visit him during his last days. We can deliver flowers, or another token of remembrance, to the resting place of John Arthur Lambert on your behalf:
John Arthur Lambert content media
0
0
7
AttendServices
Admin
More actions